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Hi all,
I've got a 1995 Toro Wheelhorse that's been a great machine but lately has been nickle and dime-ing me to death. Just put a couple hundred bucks in for the deck/spindle repair. Seems to be using a bit of oil and lately after I have been running it for about a half to 3/4 of an hour, it dies out like it's run out of gas even though there is lots of gas there. At what stage do you give it up and get a younger model?
 

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Well, that's up to you, your wallet and your patients.. :) Try checking you gas cap and make sure the vent is clear. Now that you have a new deck assy. it may be worth hanging on to. Other issue could be is your carb may need a little cleaning as well as your gas tank.
 

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We all have been there at some point be it a tractor, car, home appliance. ;)

I don't know that there is a predefined one size fits all stage to cave. The average person gets a little squeamish at repair costs half the price of a new one. But that is also variable depending on whether you can do the work yourself or have to pay someone to do it for you. Also coming into play is how long you are willing and able to do without the unit. If it is your only mower your more pressed into getting something more reliable then if it is one you only use once in a while.

Personally I caved in on my old Jake rider when I was loosing second gear and the spindles went bad. The only way to replace the spindles at that time I found was to have them custom cut/tapped from a blank bearing from Motion Industries by a machine shop. I could have still bought the transmission parts but all of this hit at a time I was having a lingering bout of back trouble and it was my main mower. So despite it still being fixable for not a lot of money if I did the work myself, the back and leg pain from using the lawnmower the better of two hours each week and my not being really able to tolerate much crawling around out there working on it pushed me over the edge to get the brandy new (at the time) Deere in my signature. ;)
 

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I replied to your thread when you asked this on LawnWorld. I said:

Newer machine aren't made like they used to be, but if you are paying too much to fix it, you might want to think about it. But some people keep old machines just because they are something you don't see anymore. You decide. :ThumbUp:
 
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Oil consumption might make it too costly to bother with. It might need a new coil. Maybe it is as simple as the gas cap being plugged. Carb, plugged fuel filter, bad Karma, etc. Find someone who sells decent veteran mowers, like Eric, jr. Maybe they will take yours in trade. There are lots of good machines out there, older machines, with a lot of life left in them. It's hard to praise any of the new "Consumer Grade" riders. Good luck.
 
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