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I've got a new Cub Cadet LTX 1040 (19 hp riding mower). Anyway, the front tires are constantly going flat. I have to fill them every time I get started and usually have to stop once or twice to fill them again. They are the tubeless air-filled type. No puncture holes, just doesn't seem to keep a good seal on the bead. Twice now they were so flat I had to take them to my neighbor's gas station and he uses an air compressor to fill them enough to get them to re-seal. What a pain. Any suggestions? Will tire sealant like that puncture seal gunk work or just ruin my tire?
 

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I'd say if it's a "new" cub Cadet you should ask about replacement tires from the dealer. My cheapie Craftsman mower has only needed air once (since new) in the last six years. The tires should be sealing properly, there must be some defect of some sort going on. When I first read your post I missed the "new" part and was just going to say it sounds like you have old worn out tires. Good luck.
 

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The puncture seal gunk would probably work great. After all,it's garanteed for life.
The best way I have found to handle the leaky tire problem is to replace the tires with 4 ply tires. I usually use "tack" on the bead and usually the only time I have to touch them is when they have worn out and you have to replace them.

I have tried slime and all the other products which just resulted in a real mess when I had to actually repair the tire or clean the rim and bead. I just don't recommend using that stuff, but then that's a personal choice.
 

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The best way I have found to handle the leaky tire problem is to replace the tires with 4 ply tires. I usually use "tack" on the bead and usually the only time I have to touch them is when they have worn out and you have to replace them.

I have tried slime and all the other products which just resulted in a real mess when I had to actually repair the tire or clean the rim and bead. I just don't recommend using that stuff, but then that's a personal choice.
I've used SLIME on two separate riding mowers. One Huskee 46 inch and a Cub Cadet SLT 1554 running over ground that had mesquite thorns (central Texas) and the SLIME has worked great. Before the SLIME I had continual air problems before mowing the two acres. SLime saved my mowing life.
 

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New Mower... Have the dealer check them out. Once had a new car with a tire loosing air. It was NOT the tire but the rim. There was a leak around one of the welds of the hub to the rim. Or it could be some foreign object on rim of tire that prevents the tire from sealing to the rim. Have used "Slime" with varying results.
Good luck, Gil
 

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I've used SLIME on two separate riding mowers. One Huskee 46 inch and a Cub Cadet SLT 1554 running over ground that had mesquite thorns (central Texas) and the SLIME has worked great. Before the SLIME I had continual air problems before mowing the two acres. SLime saved my mowing life.
I am very happy that you have had good luck with it. we don't have Mesquite here in Georgia but we do have thorns -- all kinds of them. While the sealer does help, it always slowly leaks out anyway over a weeks time. So each time I went out to use my mower I had to air up all four tire's. Another thing is that some of my slow leaks were around the rim and the slime never seen to reach that area. So I got sick and tired of dealing with it and decided to fix it permanently and so I did. I still have to air up my tires once or twice a year but that's about it.

I don't think there is really a right or wrong way it's just about what works for you. At my age I don't want to keep monkeying with it, I want to do it one time and be done with it, that's what happens to you when you pass 70.

I do love the slime air pump tho:)
 

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I've been using silicone based grease (caliper grease) at the bead to rim contact on tubeless tires. Cheap ratcheting tie-downs make good bead expanders too.
 

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I'm a big fan of the Green Slime! I've used it on all my mowers, as well as my tandem axle trailer, and even car tires. The trick is to use enough of it (as stated on the label), and to drive it right away for ten minutes or longer to distribute it evenly and allow it time to "tack up". My trailer rims had extreme rust around the bead area and the slime took care of that problem. I buy it by the gallon at Wal-Mart. I do have my own air compressor and a portable air tank that I keep in the truck for emergencies though.
 

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I use clear silicone rubber to fix rim leaks on a good tire.
If the tire is questionable, I always put an inner tube in it, inner tubes are cheap.
I also put inner tubes in NEW tubeless tires that are mounted on tube type rims, the rim profile is different and the tubeless will seal but breaks off easily at lower tire pressures.
I've seen many tires with rim leaks that Slime would not fix because it never got spread up to the bead.
I don't use Slime or Fixaflat but I also have the shop and tools to break down these small tires.
It seems to be a matter of whatever you find works best for the price you want to pay.

-
 

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i've used slime on all my tires with good results. but a brand new mower leaking air? i would ask them to fix or replace them.
 

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I can't help but notice all of you folks having good luck with Slime live down South, so this really won't apply to you guys.

I also had good success with Slime on a troublesome cart that I use for yard debris in the summer. I was sold on this stuff!

But in the winter, I use the cart to haul firewood. I went out one very cold day only to find two flat tires. Turns out Slime crystalizes when it gets really cold. NO amount of cleaning would allow me to set the bead. I finally broke down and bought solid tires for the cart. While that's not an option for tractor tires, I'm just saying, if you use your tires in very cold climates, I don't recommend the Slime solution.
 

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Just be aware, if using liquid sealants, some brands (maybe not all) will eat your rims. This rim was on my JD 420 when I bought it, don't know what brand of sealant or how long it had been in the tire. ~~ grnspot110
 

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Just be aware, if using liquid sealants, some brands (maybe not all) will eat your rims. This rim was on my JD 420 when I bought it, don't know what brand of sealant or how long it had been in the tire. ~~ grnspot110
You are correct. I had been told by several people that had that issue with fix a flat. The original owner of my Scag used it and when I put new tires on it the rims were pitted inside. I used a wire wheel and got all the corrosion out, then primed it real good with rustoleum. I've had no problem since. I have seen no evidence of corrosion with the green slime to date, and I've been using it for about three years now. I put new tires on my trailer and the rims look fine.
 

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I agree that you should take it back to the dealer and at the very least he should put tubes in the tires if they are leaking at the bead. I'm not 100% sure the slime would work for the bead leaking. Anyway welcome to the forum.
 
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