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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking about using that bottle of Slime, that can of FIX A FLAT, or any other tire sealant? Hope you are not the one changing the tire!!

It may seem like a quick fix, and it is, however you or the next guy will be spending extra time cleaning, scraping, sand blasting and painting in the end.

This was a Cadet Yard Bug wheel that I thought I would be able to do a quick swap of tires.

Rim1.jpg
This was the first thing I saw.

Rim2.jpg
The inside of the tire.

Rim3.jpg
I thought the rim was trashed, just a nasty mess.

OK, quick job.....scrape the rim, rinse the rim, dry the rim, sand blast the rim, clean rim again, paint the rim, wait a week for paint to dry...I live in Florida the humidity state..

OK ready for tire!

Rim4.jpg
All dry and ready to go!

Rim5.jpg
Valve stem mounted.

Rim6.jpg
Tire mounted and aired up..Piece of cake!

Some (most) of the tire sealants have some type of rust inhibitor in them, but they still take their toll on your rim.

In my most humble opinion, which does not reflect the opinions of MLF or the staff, Go buy an inner tube or replace the tire!

Thank you and be safe.
 

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Nice write up, Bruce! :)

It may seem like a quick fix, and it is, however you or the next guy will be spending extra time cleaning, scraping, sand blasting and painting in the end.
Yeah, I definitely agree about that! It sure does make a mess to say the least and has an odd smell.

The only time that I've really ever used Slime was actually in a rear motorcycle tire as scary as that sounds. While I was on a trip a few years ago in California on my Kawasaki Z1000, I ran into a flat and ended up filling it up using Slime as a temporary solution for the time being. I was pretty impressed though by how well it worked for an emergency solution and it miraculously didn't lose any pressure either after a couple of hundred extra miles of riding on it that way. :bag:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree, in an emergency situation, you do what you have to do! But when time is on your side you get it fixed properly, where as myself, I have never been in an emergency where I just had to get my yard cut. :D
The nasty cases are the ones that this is the permanent fix for their flat and eventually someone pays! :mad:
 

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I found out someone had used it in a tire on a mower at work after I tried to measure the pressure in it with my best personal tire gauge. What a mess that was!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's a good point Mark, I bet it would mess up a wet gauge for loaded tires.
 

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I fully agree with the folly of using Slime. I've used 2 bottles over the last few years to stop leaks in tires on a couple of my beater cars. It's not a permanent solution and once you put Slime in a tire, no tire repair place will touch it, so consider it a write-off. It's only a last ditch emergency repair before eventually replacing the tire. Putting in a tube is a much better option for lawn and garden equipment, but those little wheels are an absolute b**ch to work on.
 

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When I bought my 1983 JD 420, it had a slow leak in one front tire. When I dismounted the tire, this is what I found!

Don't know what brand of sealant was used, but it eat a hole the size of the lead in a pencil through the rim. I cleaned it, epoxied it, & repainted it. Used a tube, as the V61's needed tubes anyway.
 

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So somebody tried to stop a leak in a tube-type rim and tire with no tube, using Slime? That sounds hilarious to those of us who grew up before tubeless tires. :ROFL
 

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I always tell people who bring in a tire repair that if there has ever been slime or FAF it will be $20-25+ EXTRA just for the cleanup. Like everyone else, I was tired of using tire tools on the floor, so when I set up as an Oregon dealer, as part of my initial order I sprung for their manual tire changer and optional rim clamp. That thing has been worth its weight in gold!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What would something like that set the average joe like myself back?
 

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I have both the HF manual tires changers and have about $65 stuck into the two of them buying them on sale. The small one worked better for front wheels and the bigger one works better for 12 inch and up wheels. I mounted each changer to a 2 inch square tube and cemented a 2 inch receiver into my garage floor. That way I can keep them out of the way or put the one I need to use into the receiver. I have used both for more than 10 years with zero problems. Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thats a great idea Rodger, I like that and I'm a HF fan too! :bag: (China Stuff) but does the job...
 

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I have never seen one from HF in person, but from the video's I have seen they appear to do the job. I do like the rim clamp thought that is on my Oregon. There are some tires I could not of done without it, and I think I can even do up to a 15" car tire. I drilled in the concrete floor and installed threaded inserts to bolt the machine to when I need it, unbolt it and store it in the corner when I don't. I like your idea of the receiver better though, sounds much quicker.
 

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I have also learned my lesson, I used slime years ago, it seemed to do it's job, a slight leak reappeared the next year. The rim was blistered and very rusty, the tire had a terrible black coating on the inside. Many, many days later after sandblasting and painting I was back in the saddle again. I say buy a new tire or an inner tube, stay away from the quick fix Unless it is absolutely necessary.......:mad:.....your mower and you will be happy campers
 
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