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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here are some pictures that I took today from the Seattle International Motorcycle Show that I thought you guys might like to see! Please be prepared though, the quality of many of the photos if not most are not that great as most had to be done fairly quick, but you get the idea. There were quite a few vintage bikes there too as you will see.

Enjoy!



These next few pics are of the brand new Ducati Panigale 1199 Superbike. My camera did not do this bike justice so I grabbed these pictures off of another site I visit. This bike is oh my gosh.... amazing!! It is truely one of those machines that makes you drop to your knees.













The new Diavel







The new 2012 848 Streetfighter











MV Agusta





This next bike I love!! This old Honda really has the right vintage styling.









 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·






Mercedes AMG inspired Diavel






















 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)


Like my old bike!









I would have a hard time riding one of these things!









Eric Buell's new $46K carbon fiber bike. Pretty cool to see and sit on!









I LOVE old bikes like this early 1900's Harley.









:eek:

Torwards the end of the show on our way out we came across this. Somebody had a little accident! As I said, :eek:

I don't think it did much damage (if any) to it though. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Would've liked to have taken home anyone of them, but the Panigale is definitely mind blowing!
 

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Nothing sexier than that Ducati red. Ohhh, and the way they sound too. My gosh, there's some bikes that bring back some memories. The Classic Japanese Motorcycle. The lines and looks of those early inline 4s. Honda's CBs and Kawasaki's KZs. And the Kawi H1. Good lord those things were scary! Tricked out with expansion chambers, even with silencers, you couldn't hear for the rest of the day. They were great in a straight line if you could keep the front wheel down when it hit its power, but not so good in the corners, but then, maybe it was me. Thanks Austen.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nothing sexier than that Ducati red. Ohhh, and the way they sound too. My gosh, there's some bikes that bring back some memories. The Classic Japanese Motorcycle. The lines and looks of those early inline 4s. Honda's CBs and Kawasaki's KZs. And the Kawi H1. Good lord those things were scary! Tricked out with expansion chambers, even with silencers, you couldn't hear for the rest of the day. They were great in a straight line if you could keep the front wheel down when it hit its power, but not so good in the corners, but then, maybe it was me. Thanks Austen.:)
Haha,

Yeah my Dad has always said the big street bikes from the 70's went well in a straight line, but when a corner came up or was time to apply the brakes for that matter, it was a whole different story. :D
 

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Yeah, the addition of a single hydraulic disc brake on the front end was a pretty big deal back then. Those CBs and KZs were the grand daddies of today's super bikes.

Did you happen to notice how skinny the tires were back then?

I've seen a picture of a KZ900 on display at the Kawasaki museum. 0 miles, all roped off, with a small sign that politely asks, "Please, Do Not Touch". Gosh that was a great bike. First bike I rode that I can remember actually looking at the speedo and realizing I was waaaay past the 100 mark. I was lucky enough to just be coming of age and start riding back when those bikes were new, not classics. Dang, those were the days.:eek:

I think that guy in the last picture with that full dress Victory is demonstrating the proper way to pick up a dropped bike alone, without hurting yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Yeah, the addition of a single hydraulic disc brake on the front end was a pretty big deal back then. Those CBs and KZs were the grand daddies of today's super bikes.
Yeah, it's amazing how technology has advanced over the years on bikes. By today's standards you'll find twin four pot Brembo calipers on huge 320mm floating rotors that'll nearly through you off the bike! At least the supersports from that time period were actually comfortable to ride though. ;)

Yeah, the addition of a single hydraulic disc brake on the front end was a pretty big deal back then. Those CBs and KZs were the grand daddies of today's super bikes.
Yup,

The tires back then were a lot skinnier and square on top compared to sport bike tires of today where they are rounder on the sides, wider and softer. Much more traction in the corners!

I've seen a picture of a KZ900 on display at the Kawasaki museum. 0 miles, all roped off, with a small sign that politely asks, "Please, Do Not Touch". Gosh that was a great bike.
That's awesome!! I can't imagine what it was like seeing a "brand new" vintage bike that hasn't seen any miles or use. Fully restored bikes are great to look at all day, but sometimes they are a little more over done than they were originally like the chrome and paint is shinier for example. When you can see an original preserved bike, it's great to see just how they did it from the factory.

First bike I rode that I can remember actually looking at the speedo and realizing I was waaaay past the 100 mark. I was lucky enough to just be coming of age and start riding back when those bikes were new, not classics. Dang, those were the days.:eek:
Haha, yeah that is definitely quite the feeling and I can't imagine what it was like doing it on one of those bikes back then. It's great that you can appreciate those bikes in the way that you can!

I think that guy in the last picture with that full dress Victory is demonstrating the proper way to pick up a dropped bike alone, without hurting yourself.
Yeah, after looking at the picture some more, they may have just been doing a demonstration of how to properly pick up a heavy weight bike.
 

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Yeah, it's amazing how technology has advanced over the years on bikes. By today's standards you'll find twin four pot Brembo calipers on huge 320mm floating rotors that'll nearly through you off the bike! At least the supersports from that time period were actually comfortable to ride though. ;)
Kind of hard to imagine where they're going to go! Back in the day that old Harley was at the top of the game. Just imagine what the bikes 10-20 years from now are going to be like.

Yup,

The tires back then were a lot skinnier and square on top compared to sport bike tires of today where they are rounder on the sides, wider and softer. Much more traction in the corners!
They're pretty much all tread and no sidewall. More traction, and a lot more money when you need to replace them, which is waaay too often.

That's awesome!! I can't imagine what it was like seeing a "brand new" vintage bike that hasn't seen any miles or use. Fully restored bikes are great to look at all day, but sometimes they are a little more over done than they were originally like the chrome and paint is shinier for example. When you can see an original preserved bike, it's great to see just how they did it from the factory.
It is good to see a well preserved "vintage" bike, but it doesn't compare with the feeling of turning the key and hitting the starter button! I still get a thrill out of every bike I get a chance to ride, no matter what vintage.

Haha, yeah that is definitely quite the feeling and I can't imagine what it was like doing it on one of those bikes back then. It's great that you can appreciate those bikes in the way that you can!
Actually, it was better in a lot of ways. Smoother for one. Those old standards were powerful, but in a much more subtle way. Not like the screaming gotta' get there now sport bikes of today. You could go crazy fast if you wanted, then throw a windshield or faring on them and go touring. Loved the old standards.

Yeah, after looking at the picture some more, they may have just been doing a demonstration of how to properly pick up a heavy weight bike.
Yep, too many guys standing around with their arms crossed. Funny thing, that's probably the second thing they teach at police motor officer school. First thing is; Look at where you wan to go, not at where you are. If you look at the ground, you will fall down. Lesson two; You looked down, didn't you. Here's how you pick it up.
 

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... Funny thing, that's probably the second thing they teach at police motor officer school. First thing is; Look at where you wan to go, not at where you are. If you look at the ground, you will fall down. Lesson two; You looked down, didn't you. Here's how you pick it up.
I miss seeing the guys out on the three wheelers up in Columbus.

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/garyroyer/2197851977/

Always thought the three wheelers would be a trick on ramps and dodging cars on the city highways at 65+ mph.
 

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I got a chance to ride several different 3 wheel set ups this last summer. A couple of them were the kind where the rear wheel of the motorcycle still provides the propulsion, a couple of straight axel rear ends and an independent suspension rear end or two. They do make for a different riding experience.:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I bet it is strange riding a three wheeler! I have never really been that interested in them, but that's not to say that I would ever turn down the opportunity to ride one for fun. Yeah, I can't imagine that the handling of them is all that great, at least nothing near the direct sharpness of being on two wheels.

Speaking of three wheels, I'd love to demo a Can-Am Spyder. I think they would be pretty fun and a lot of design has been put into the handling department of them.
 

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There's a Can-Am dealer right by where I work and I see them pretty often coming an going over there during the summer. They look like they would be pretty stable. I suspect part of their sales are in part like how scooters seem to come back with more prevalence the last couple of years due to fuel prices. People buying them that are not real big bike bikers but like the fuel savings and perhaps might have had a motorcycle when younger and then decided to try and get back into it again later in life. It would be a way for someone with some physical disabilities to get back on a bike again. I say that as most I see are men and women of retirement age on up. Course part of that too is the price tag on them.

Honestly with my motion sickness and accompanying balance issues at times it would probably be my safest bet if I wanted to ever leave the city limits on one. I put 4K miles on a moped as a teenager but hung it up once I got a car license and never actually graduated to a motorcycle. :eek: But for the last 30 years since I keep looking and thinking someday when I have some extra money and a place to store it inside (and my parents are no longer around to have a panic attack over just the thought of me on one ;) ) I'm gonna get a motor bike again of some size and type even if it has to be a three wheeler to keep me upright. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
There's a Can-Am dealer right by where I work and I see them pretty often coming an going over there during the summer. They look like they would be pretty stable. I suspect part of their sales are in part like how scooters seem to come back with more prevalence the last couple of years due to fuel prices. People buying them that are not real big bike bikers but like the fuel savings and perhaps might have had a motorcycle when younger and then decided to try and get back into it again later in life. It would be a way for someone with some physical disabilities to get back on a bike again. I say that as most I see are men and women of retirement age on up. Course part of that too is the price tag on them.
That's really cool! Yeah, we don't see them around here too often so it's a bit of a rarity to even actually see one going down the road. They sure do look the part though while doing so I must say. Then again, we don't have by any means have the greatest of riding weather around here either so that probably explains some of it. You're definitely right about the fuel savings and how a lot of people are getting back into riding because of it. I've noticed how there are a lot more scooters on the road in the summer time than there used to be it seems. In the state of Washington at least, you don't have to acquire a motorcycle endoresment or other type of licence in order to ride a moped/scooter.

Honestly with my motion sickness and accompanying balance issues at times it would probably be my safest bet if I wanted to ever leave the city limits on one. I put 4K miles on a moped as a teenager but hung it up once I got a car license and never actually graduated to a motorcycle. :eek: But for the last 30 years since I keep looking and thinking someday when I have some extra money and a place to store it inside (and my parents are no longer around to have a panic attack over just the thought of me on one ;) ) I'm gonna get a motor bike again of some size and type even if it has to be a three wheeler to keep me upright. :D
You would probably enjoy something like a dual sport as they are easy to ride and very versatile. They are a lot of fun to go take up into the mountains or just cruise the backroads on for some sight seeing. Not too mention, they are a great bike to start out with or hone your skills on before moving up to a big street bike. ;)
 

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...You would probably enjoy something like a dual sport as they are easy to ride and very versatile. They are a lot of fun to go take up into the mountains or just cruise the backroads on for some sight seeing. Not too mention, they are a great bike to start out with or hone your skills on before moving up to a big street bike. ;)
Yea, I've always thought I would like to have one of the big high end touring bikes but that would not make much sense at least for a starter until I found out if I still can physically take the vibration and such. I would definitely need something with an upright sitting position. I saw an older guy last summer tooling around town on one of these:

2011 PCX Overview - Honda Powersports

Thought they looked kind of neat and not terribly expensive when I looked at them at the local dealer. Kind of a scooter with a slightly bigger engine trying to look like a motorcycle. :D

Figured maybe for something small and cheaper it would still have a little softer suspension. It has though a surprising 280 lb curb weight and max speed around 60mph. Top speed on the city streets here is 35-45mph.

I have not looked into the specifics on drivers license here since I had the moped. But back then you could get a moped license at age 14 and a car license at 16 which also covers mopeds. Scooters required a normal motorcycle endorsement. The line between a scooter and moped was mostly decided by the lack of pedals and an engine larger then 49cc or with a top governed speed above 25-30 mph. My Motobecane is 49cc and would run 30mph downhill with a good tail wind. Funny part was my buddy had a Yamaha with only foot pegs that was rated 35mph and he had to get a motorcycle license for it. Same 49 cc engine but used a kick lever to wind a spring that started it instead of pedaling. When he went to take the maneuvering test all the other guys borrowed it to take their test on instead of their own larger real motorcycles. :D I was surprised they got away with that.

(Actually still have the moped but my mother missed the wheel stop block I had on the floor and bumped into it one day in the garage with her car a number of years ago and bent the frame. :rolleyes: Another project I have on the back burner.)

The thing I did not like about the moped was not being able to keep up with traffic. Gives four wheelers one more perceived reason to run you off the road. :( I ran 90% back streets and alleys on it all those miles. Bad part about that was in the older section of town the alleys have a lot of blind intersections blocked by barns and garages. So they were not terribly safe either at more then 5-10mph.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That Honda looks like a nice alternative to a scooter! More powerful to handle keeping up with traffic and a bit more like a motorcycle like you said. I'm sure they are very comfortable to ride, it looks like a very relaxed riding position with a soft seat. I know that a lot of those bigger "scooters" are automatics as well.

I'm sorry to here what happened to your moped! That kind of thing has been known to happen, but what can you do.
 

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A bent Motobecane!:eek: Maybe it can be straightened out easily. They had a pretty neat variable belt drive set up, didn't they? Mopeds are a hoot to ride.:D Scooters are cool, and Honda has some of the best of them. That PCX is a pretty sharp looking one, and that little 125 will surprise you.
 

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A bent Motobecane!:eek: Maybe it can be straightened out easily. They had a pretty neat variable belt drive set up, didn't they?...
Yea, kind of a fancy grease-able chainsaw type clutch, then to short belt to chain to wheel setup. Seems like the high end of the line had a two speed setup somehow but I can't recall for sure now. I probably have the sales flyer laying about yet someplace for it that showed the different models that year.

Mines very similar to this one except it is gray and black with no chrome. As you can see in the photo the fuel tank is part of the frame. That is what will make it very difficult to straighten. :(

Moped Photo Gallery - 1980 Motobecane Mobylette
 
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