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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I'm at it again! I've decided to improve my rust removal technique. I now have a 10 gallon bucket with @4.5 gallons of apple cider vinegar in it for soaking larger parts.



I decided to try this out on a large Briggs flywheel from a 14.5 HP engine. This one has the replaceable aluminum ring gear and bigger magnets. My main concern was if there would be a reaction with the epoxy/glue that holds the magnets in place and the aluminum ring gear. I soaked this one for about a day and a half. The following are before and after pictures.






After removing the flywheel, I washed it off in water and used a nylon bristled scrub brush to knock off rust that was just laying on the surface. I did find that with water the item did slightly flash rust. You may see a slight orange tint in the after pictures. That was easily fixed with a little WD40. The next pictures show the finished item.




I used a flash on this to show the magnets underneath.


The ACV did not have any effect on the magnet glue or the aluminum. I could have removed the ring gear but I chose not to for this experiment.
I hope you folks have as much fun as I am cleaning and restoring these parts and remember to be safe!

SAFETY WARNING: Be sure to use the appropriate safety gear such as gloves, eye protection, good ventilation etc.
 

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That ACV treatment is amazing. Who would have guessed it would work that well on that rusty flywheel. I'm going to have to get some.

I know it's inexpensive, but do you expect to get several uses out of the same batch of ACV?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Was thinking the same thing. If you notice, I dated the lid and wrote down the contents so I could track it. I have a 1/2 gallon of ACV that I put in a plastic coffee can that I have used multiple times and it seems to have not lost its potency yet. I'll probably drain off the good stuff, (filter it) periodically as the rust and residual grease does tend to build up in the bottom. You can't beat $4 a gallon! All you need is a little patients and you'll end up with great results. For stuff with just a little bit of rust doesn't require as much time, sometimes as little as 10 minutes.
You gotta try it, its a blast! Well actually you don't have to blast... :sidelaugh
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Aside from the amount of time it was soaking, how long did that take you?
Not really taking into consideration the time it took to disassemble the engine, the soak was @ a day and a half, only because I had to work. It may not need as much time as I gave it, there was no need to rush on my part. The post soak cleanup only took @10 minutes. In a commercial environment, the times involved may be a bit much but for restoration purposes where your part might be the only one left in the world, I think its great and cheap alternative to the high dollar rust removers and converters or sending it off to have it done commercially. I just like tinkering with these things :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm at a point that I'm looking around for things to soak!:sidelaugh
The only side effect that I've found is the longer you soak the more it will remove an anodized or protective coating. I know there are ways of reapplying that finish as we do it in the aviation industry, I was thinking about doing some threads on that process in the near future.

NOTE: I have not tried anything that has a zinc coating as I am leery of mixing an acid based item with zinc. I'm not a chemist or metallurgist and don't know if it would be safe or not. I'm sure I'll try it one day outdoors. :dunno:
 

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Acetic acid is mildly corrosive to metals including iron, magnesium, and zinc, forming hydrogen gas and salts called acetates. I do not recommend doing this for anything containing zinc without proper ventilation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Acetic acid is mildly corrosive to metals including iron, magnesium, and zinc, forming hydrogen gas and salts called acetates. I do not recommend doing this for anything containing zinc without proper ventilation.
Thats kinda what I was thinking and thats why I was kinda avoiding it ;) But I'm sure I'll come across something that I'll try it out on but outside. Same reason I avoid welding anything galvanized, but if I do, I wear a pretty decent respirator. Thanks for looking up the chemical reactions.:2th:
 

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I need to dig up a clean bucket with a lid!!!!!!!!! :ThumbUp:
 

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Wonder if you could speed up the reaction even more with the old battery charger and electrodes trick. Definitely would want to do it outside as it would no doubt produce some gas bubbles.
 

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Once again, amazing results!! Thanks for sharing the process. :2th:
 

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Rust removal on Blade Brake parts too.

After seeing the results Five Points has had with his ACV experiments, I tried it out myself on parts of a Roto Stop BBC) from one of my walk behind mowers.

Here's the before shot of the major parts of the Roto Stop. The after pictures of the first three parts I soaked. They stewed in the ACV for about 14 hours. The bottom part was the most rusted and I had to kind of help the process along with a not so stiff stainless brush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Very nice, if I have a very rusty piece, I'll leave it in for a day to day and a half. How did the bearings hold up, did the grease stay in them?
 

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Those turned out great, BW.
 

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Bearing held up just fine. Good thing too, that thing is $30 from Motion Industries!

The remaining parts are in the ACV and should be good to go tomorrow.
 
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