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Recommended tire pressure for John Deere D160 lawn tractor

744 Views 10 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  neptune
Hi. I have a question about the recommended tire pressure for a John Deere D160. In the operating manual, all it says is:

1) All four tires should have the same pressure.
2) You should look at the sides of the tires to determine the exact pressure.

Well, the tires only list the maximum pressure allowed (12 psi), not necessarily the recommended pressure. :confused: So, I called up John Deere to ask them about this, but they couldn't provide any helpful information. They finally just told me to consult a local dealer instead. Then I called up the local repair shop, and they actually gave me the wrong informationthey said to put 15 psi in the front tires and 10 psi in the back. 🤷🏻‍♂️

So, what's a lawn-tractor owner supposed to do? Should I just put 12 psi in all four tires then? Thanks for any info on this.
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Welcome to MLF neptune. My Troy Bilt manual shows my front tires as 14 psi, and the rear at 10 psi.
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in that tractor I run 15# in front and 12# in rear .....after setting the pressure i pull on to a slab and confirm the deck is level.
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12psi front and back per manual I found:

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Welcome to MLF neptune.
Thank you, Grunt. :)

My Troy Bilt manual shows my front tires as 14 psi, and the rear at 10 psi.
Okay, that's very similar to what that local repair place told me. Only problem is that on my front tires, it says, "Maximum inflation: 12 psi." ;)
in that tractor I run 15# in front and 12# in rear .....after setting the pressure i pull on to a slab and confirm the deck is level.
Thank you for this info, 8808hill.
12psi front and back per manual I found:

View attachment 63059

Thank you, Mark / Ohio—looks like you nailed it! 👍 Their statement right underneath the figures is a bit misleading, though—they should state explicitly that the maximum pressure listed on the tires is the same as the recommended pressure.

Anyway, I went back and looked at my manual, and—sure enough—I found the page that you posted above. :cool: I had looked in the index under "Checking Tire Pressure," and on that page, all they say is: "Check the sides of the tires for the correct pressure." Well, why didn't they just say, "Consult the SPECIFICATIONS section at the back of this manual for your particular model number"?? :rolleyes: It's kinda interesting that even John Deere customer service couldn't dig up this info for me. 🤔

It's great that now I know exactly what pressure to inflate my tires to. Thanks again, Mark. 👏
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My LT150 specs 10psi rear and 14psi front. I don't recall what max psi is on them. I found the standard tire gauges don't work too accurate at those low pressures. So I went a bought a special low pressure gauge to set them. That was when the tractor was almost new 20 years ago. I still set them to spec when adjusting the deck height and level. But funny part is I found on my bumpy ground I can run with one tire real low and still don't see much difference in cut and the rears running lower seems to give me more traction on the slopes and less of a jolt on the bumps. So now in my old age I have developed the bad habit of pressing the ball of my foot on each one before heading out to mow and if I feel the same amount of give on the tire tread on all of them call it good. 😏 Only if one feels softer do I break down and attempt to find my special little gauge and fire up the air compressor. They are pretty stiff tires and have to be almost empty of air before they settle much. I worry more about breaking the bead loose on one due to low pressure then I do the cut quality. They can be a real bear to get reset on the beads enough to seal even if you wrap the tread with a ratchet strap to flair out the sidewalls. I broke down and took one off the work mower to the tire shop once and it took two of them and an air blaster gun to get it reset. I never would have got that one myself. 😄
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I have been cutting 4 acres of grass for 15 years now on a 52" craftsman 1500 22 hp kohler engine machine and I never use a gauge other than my eyeballs. I know my tires are low when the profile of the tire is flat when looking from the rear or front of the tire. I check tire pressure this way every time I cut grass. The rear tires are the first thing I look at as I enter my barn with the lawn mower facing forward. If the rear tires look good then I sit in the seat, after I check the oil, I always check the oil before I start, then as I am in my seat, I look at my front tires and if they have that same rounded look I am good. This has never failed me, as in breaking a bead, and I do cut on hilly terrain as I am in WV.

I'm shifting gears here now, how to install tires on a rim. I use the starter fluid and fire method. Look it up on youtube. It is fun and effective. I did this on my son-in-laws John Deere, he wanted to go with an aggressive tread, for traction, and all we could get them in was a 6 ply, which is a very stiff sidewall when you have such a small profile to work with. Again the starter fluid and fire method was fun but effective.

Good luck.
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I found the standard tire gauges don't work too accurate at those low pressures. So I went a bought a special low pressure gauge to set them.
I recently bought this digital pressure gauge:


Hopefully it's at least reasonably accurate at low pressures.

So now in my old age I have developed the bad habit of pressing the ball of my foot on each one before heading out to mow and if I feel the same amount of give on the tire tread on all of them call it good. 😏
Probably not a bad rule of thumb!
I have been cutting 4 acres of grass for 15 years now on a 52" craftsman 1500 22 hp kohler engine machine and I never use a gauge other than my eyeballs. I know my tires are low when the profile of the tire is flat when looking from the rear or front of the tire. I check tire pressure this way every time I cut grass.
I guess I don't need to stress out too much about proper tire pressure then. ;)

I always check the oil before I start
Sounds like a good habit to follow.

I do cut on hilly terrain as I am in WV.
I drove through there once—lots of mountains! 😁
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