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Have any of you folks painted your equipment during restoration? How about the prep work? Would you do anything different, or have you found some processes that really worked well. I never had luck with the spray paint in cans years ago, but it seems as though both the paints and the spray mechanisms have become more user friendly.

A few years ago I painted a bicycle out of a spray can. Really turned out pretty good. Not a professional quality by any means, but it really went on well and when it dried it was pretty durable.

So, share some of your painting stories. Doesn't have to be about your mowers or equipment, necessarily, but some hints and tips to help those new to the process.
 

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i use Kraylon paint it gos on nice and smooth and it has an adjustable nozzle....As for prep i sand them down with a med sanding disc on my grinder then run a fine disc over it then i prime it with scratch filler primer then run some fine on it then spray it..All my paint jobs a spray can specials and they turned out good ...The only thing i hate is when i get a run in it that ticks me off
 

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i use Kraylon paint it gos on nice and smooth and it has an adjustable nozzle..
The only thing i hate is when i get a run in it that ticks me off
I have seen some pretty amazing rattle can paint jobs.

I'm pretty sure I could show you a method that's 99% effective to prevent never having a single run again :D.

Mark
 

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painting

I just redid one this spring and foud out if you sandblast and prime the paint seems to stick really well and looks good
 

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I have seen some pretty amazing rattle can paint jobs.

I'm pretty sure I could show you a method that's 99% effective to prevent never having a single run again :D.

Mark
That is always my problem when spraying anything. I try to put too much on at once and/or I don't get the surface prepped and cleaned well enough and get bubbles.:rolleyes:
 

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im going to be doing both my snappers this winter, ill be sure to take pics and post up

i may spray bomb it, but more than likely im using a paint sprayer
 

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If you add one, single step to your paint application then you've conquered the run, sag and other problems too.

Just add a piece of solvent resistant paper, hung horizontally on your wall (and near your paint project) and apply the paint there first you can time the flash coats and finger touch the edge to see how sticky it is. If it's wet and runny (on your paper) then it's too soon to apply another coat...If it's sticky and leave little or no color on your finger glove, it's time for another paint coat.

This may help a little as I've been doing this for years:

This is the paper attached to my wall....It's there to adjust my gun spray pattern, viscosity and air pressure. But, especially to keep runs from happening in my paint project:



The same paper after the base tack coat, second hiding coat and third/fourth coat to completion. (you can see just above my fat head, two lines from adjusting my gun...the rest is to prevent runs and sags)



The real trick is to apply the paint to the paper the first time, and every single time before it goes on your project. If you learn this simple discipline, you will have licked the run problem.
 

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...
The same paper after the base tack coat, second hiding coat and third/fourth coat to completion....
I know it is probably a pretty large variable. But on average how many coats would you put on when repainting an engine compared to exterior body panels that will be buffed and polished?
 

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The amount of paint applied is most often related to the color, paint chemical compounds and brand.

Even with high end ($) paint - yellows, whites, light browns and metallic colors don't cover very well. It usually takes a tack coat followed by 3 full wet coats and a finish coat. The very first coat of paint is the 'Tack' coat, which is nothing more than a transparent fogging. It's used to promote adhesion on top of your primed project and 'tooth' for the following color coats. In simpler terms, the tack coat is the glue that chemically binds all the following color to your paint target.

The above applies to expensive, inexpensive HVLP spray guns, siphon style spray guns and Rattle Cans.

I'll be switching gears :))) in the Part ll thread and showing better pictures of how I mix and apply paint through an HVLP spray gun.

I hope this helps?
 

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....I hope this helps?
Yes it does. :)

Quite the contrast to my "spray on as much as you can get to stick with each coat" method. :D

Obviously my spray painting forays have been few and far between in part due to poor results. Knowing how to do it the proper way will make it a more enjoyable experience when the need arises. Thanks for all the effort you are putting into these informative threads! :cool:
 

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I have a Toro push mower with a deck that has peeling paint, whats the best paint removal method? I was thinking sandblasting it, but most of the paint comes off by hand
 

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Dave,

If it's coming off that easy then maybe a razor blade scraper to help lift off the big stuff and sand blast the stubborn areas.
 

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Dave,

If it's coming off that easy then maybe a razor blade scraper to help lift off the big stuff and sand blast the stubborn areas.
I really enjoyed it when a high pressured pressure washer would blow the paint away in sheet's. 20 years ago we painted new car's "peeler's" for a one of the big three brands.It made a mess , but we always went to the car wash first, WOW what a mess, then the razor blade trick to what was left in-tacked.
Darn , I had a flash back there!LOL and btw, we did clean the car wash walls and floor when we were done.
 

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I bought a sand blaster from Northern Tool, under $40.00. This is the way to go.I got a military poncho and a clear face shield that I wear when blasting, cut the air back to 40 psi.

I am working on a Simplicity 4108 Regent & a 318 John Deere, I'll try to post a picture. Probaly in May 2011.

Enjoy
Doorkeeper
 

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I agree with Mark777 the tack coat is very important Just don't skimp on the prep work. ( I go 3 levels 80 grit 120 grit then 150 or 180 grit) after I blow away the dust I use Denatured Alcohol to wipe down before I paint. There are other solvents that you can use but it works pretty good for me and my spray can jobs. I don't get a pro looking job but it still looks pretty good. I could finish with a clear coat but I will want spot paint later on so I don't.
 

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If you add one, single step to your paint application then you've conquered the run, sag and other problems too.

Just add a piece of solvent resistant paper, hung horizontally on your wall (and near your paint project) and apply the paint there first you can time the flash coats and finger touch the edge to see how sticky it is. If it's wet and runny (on your paper) then it's too soon to apply another coat...If it's sticky and leave little or no color on your finger glove, it's time for another paint coat.

This may help a little as I've been doing this for years:

This is the paper attached to my wall....It's there to adjust my gun spray pattern, viscosity and air pressure. But, especially to keep runs from happening in my paint project:



The same paper after the base tack coat, second hiding coat and third/fourth coat to completion. (you can see just above my fat head, two lines from adjusting my gun...the rest is to prevent runs and sags)



The real trick is to apply the paint to the paper the first time, and every single time before it goes on your project. If you learn this simple discipline, you will have licked the run problem.
I'm friends with a couple of professional auto painters, and they both recommended this method. One still uses it to this day, the other (my personal auto body guy) has been painting for 40 years, and does a beautiful job without this step. After 40 years, I would imagine the only time he would do this step is when switching to a new brand of paint. I use this method when doing my restorations. I use some sheet metal that I have laying around.
 
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