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Cub Cadet has had this technology for some time now. Unfortunately, they had to ditch the lap bars in favor of a steering wheel and foot pedals. But its a beast on slopes and can operate where most zero turn mowers cannot.
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Unfortunately, I can't get past the steering wheel. That just sucks.

Apparently EGO is coming out in 2023 with a 4 wheel steering zero turn capable of operating on 20 degree slopes - they are calling it "E-Steer". Unfortunately, the only pics we've seen so far show that, like Cub Cadet, they've ditched the lap bars and replaced them with a steering wheel. C'mon EGO, what's up with that?

As an owner of an EGO Z6 zero turn with a sloped 1.5 acre yard, I would love to upgrade to the new "4 wheel steering" model if they come to their senses and offer a lap bar version.

Would you opt for a 4 wheel steering model (gas or electric) if it could be done with lap bars at a reasonable price premium over the 2 wheel steering models?

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I have a sloped 1.3 acre yard and manage to maintain it with a ZT but I have a few spots that are most tricky to mow and have some occasional wheel slipping which tears up the lawn a bit and an occasional unwanted ride down the hill if I am not careful. I looked at the Cub ZT's with the steering wheel and found them to be wobbly and not confidant it would work for me in the long run. It just seemed like it could be more sturdy than it is. I also avoided the Cub's because I didn't feel the decks were very good. Just my opinion. The EGO looks to be promising but with all that plastic, I'm not sure how well it will hold up. I am not opposed to a steering wheel vs lap bars but if you go the steering wheel route you might as well get a tractor. I must admit I have a neighbor with a small Cub with the steering wheel and he seems to be doing fine with it. The lawn is always in good shape and he manages a similar berm and I see no scars to speak of. I wonder if 4-wheel steer on a ZT will result in the same objections of a AWS tractor. Some views on the AWS tractors report rutting around trees and a difficulty maintaining a straight line due to the AWS.
 

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I HATE lap bars and always have. My shoulders hurt using them, they are always out of alignment, and they can never be adjusted enough so I can go forward and reverse without my beer belly getting in the way. Unfortunately, most of the industry went to them in the 90s and other better options could never catch on.
Better options are:
Country Clipper's joystick steering. It's fast, you don't have to worry about skidding the inside tire during turns, and it is designed so the faster you go the less travel you have on the joystick. It's a breeze to drive the mower at full speed in a straight line. Even better you can mow and scratch your nose at the same time! Unfortunately, it is patented so no one else can use it.
Toro/Exmark steering wheel. It never caught on because it took too much force to turn the steering wheel but you can turn with it and never leave a skid mark. If they would have added power steering it would have been a winner. (I have the Exmark model)
Cub Cadet. Steering wheel ZTR's will be the best for slopes because the front wheels help you stay on the slope - all four wheels have traction to stay on the slope. With a lap bar ZTR, the ONLY wheel that has traction is the downhill rear driving wheel. Cub Cadet's Pro series steering wheel models are wonderful to drive on slopes.
Walker Mowers. Walker's system uses a separate speed lever so there is no "push" on your arms and shoulders. The levers are between your legs and require very little movement so they are so much faster to use. You can make a Walker "dance" and never leave a mark in the turf.
Stand ons. You rest your hands on stationary bars and use your thumbs/palms to control the speed and turns. It's a lot less tiring than lap bars and gives you a lot more control over turns.
Electrics. If you tried to drive the latest Cub Cadet electric ZTR you know lap bars don't work on them. I haven't driven one yet but the Ryobi Joystick is promising. You will see a lot of innovation in the steering on the electric ZTRs - multi-function joysticks, tiny steering wheels, foot controls, 'fly by wire', and even "cockpits" on the high-end semi-autonomous mowers where your hands/arms never leave the armrests.
The farming industry is eliminating steering wheels in tractors, combines, and other equipment. Construction is eliminating lap bars in Skid steers and steering wheels in just about everything else. The mower industry is painfully slow at "creature feature" innovations but be ready - there will be many options better than lap bars soon!
 

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I use a stand on at work. (Wright Stander) They are good for tight areas and trimming. My beef with them is they are hard on the legs especially on rough ground and slopes at least for us older guys. My feet go numb after an hour no matter how much I keep shifting my weight around. If I push it out to a couple hours of mowing I can't hardly walk after getting off until the feeling comes back in my legs. Maybe they don't have that effect on everyone as I'm pretty stoved up even after an hour on my own Deere LT150 rider and have leg an back problems anyway. Just a heads up before buying a stander you might want to see if someone will let you try theirs out for a bit and see how your body reacts to it. If you have any leg or back problems your probably going to want to stay with a rider of some type.
 

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I have a 2014 Cub ZForce 60" Commercial and have 7 acres with slopes much larger than 15 degs and I love it. Steering wheel models track much better if going along the slope as the front wheels are not just casters. It has been very reliable with no repairs, but I do the maintenance and run only synthetic oils. There's no learning curve with the steering wheel. The only thing I would like to have is a suspension as my 7 acres have many rough spots. The perfect machine would have 4 wheel drive.
 
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