My Lawnmower Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,015 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at customers delivering today. He had the poor string mower outside. It has never been cleaned and the air inlet is almost clogged? It is a Kohler Courage small engine too, surprised it runs! :) :bag: :sorry:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,359 Posts
Some people just don't have any pride in their equipment.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,015 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
HAHA, I saw Courage on tin and thought ticking time bomb!! :)
Surprised it runs with the lack of treatment!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
On the topic of "caring" for equipment, where does the occasional had to run the engine on its side to get out of a pickle fall?

Last summer I was tilling a garden for a neighbor of mine when all of a sudden my Howard Gem flipped on it side. The tines chewed on and grabbed a 6" tree root and instead of the root giving, it flipped the machine over. Instead of shutting the machine off, I kept it running. It did not burn a pinch of oil, and throttled as it would have normally. It ran on its side for almost 15 minutes while I ran back to the house grabbed a chainsaw and cut the root out from underneath my tiller. Once I turned it back on its side, I continued to till and did so for another hour. My neighbor was freaking out, as was I for a bit until I remembered, ah that Wisconsin engine has pressurized oil lubrication! So I just let it run. Did I do any damage, nope not at all. Try that with a Briggs, Kohler, Honda, Kawasaki, Tecumseh, you name it and you would have had a rod threw the block in short order!

Chris
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,228 Posts
I would not have been so brave. The pump still has to have oil in it's sump to pump. My luck it would have fell with the sump on the dry upside and still fried bearings letting it run. Also if it goes so far as to have oil pudddling against the back of the piston that would seem like a recipe for hydro lock or some other catastrophic failure. Seems like it would resemble the condition of overfilling the crankcase. Oil gets whipped into a foam and bubbles don't do so well for lubrication.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,693 Posts
:ditto:Yeah, most modern pressure lube V-Twins I see have a 25 degree maximum operating angle. The oil has to get to the pickup tube somehow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
For other engines you would have had a problem, but not with a Wisconsin. The pickup line and screen cover about 1/4 of the base of the oil pan. With 3.5 quarts of oil in the pan, no matter what angle the engine is operating on it will still be pumping oil. This engine has well over 10,000 hours of operating time on it and the pistons slop around in their cylinders. It always starts on the first crank when cold, but requires a starter motor when hot. You cant beat those cast iron brutes. Nothing else even comes close,

My Wisconsin manual states that this engine with the larger capacity oil pump can operate in a 60 degree directional slope and up to a 75 degree side slope. Tis a little more than 25 degrees......

Chris
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,898 Posts
Instead of shutting the machine off, I kept it running.
"How not to treat your small engine?" Was this an example of what not to do? :dunno:
It ran on its side for almost 15 minutes while I ran back to the house grabbed a chainsaw and cut the root out from underneath my tiller.
..... Why? Why take the chance of "Potentially" ruining you engine not to mention any and all safety issues and liabilities that come to mind.
My Wisconsin manual states that this engine with the larger capacity oil pump can operate in a 60 degree directional slope and up to a 75 degree side slope.
Isn't on it's side 90°?

:scratch:

Sorry to rant but I'm just trying to see the profitability of this information provided.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,359 Posts
"How not to treat your small engine?" Was this an example of what not to do? :dunno:

..... Why? Why take the chance of "Potentially" ruining you engine not to mention any and all safety issues and liabilities that come to mind.

Isn't on it's side 90°?

:scratch:

Sorry to rant but I'm just trying to see the profitability of this information provided.
I'm sorry, but I have to agree.

All I will say is that if somebody else had told the story, they would have gotten nailed to the wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Because those are continuous duty ratings! Those engines were used on everything back in the 50' - 70's because they were so adaptable, versatile and indestructible. They will run on their side all day long everyday and not throw a fit. You clearly havent worked on one to respect how far ahead of the time that they were. I have put well over 100 hours of hard use on that engine since that incident and it runs perfectly. You guys sound like the type who only run their two cycle engines with the plug side up in fear of ruining something..........

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
You guys will love this one,

How do you fix an engine with low compression which burns oil?????

Sure you can go out and buy a set of rings, but for engines which have no parts availability you know what I do?

I get the engine running as best as I can, as soon as I can get the engine hot, I shut it down, drain its oil and fill the crankcase with gasoline. I run the engine for about 5-7 minutes or until the engine starts to hint that it wants to seize up. Then I shut the engine off, and fill the crankcase with 30 weight oil, and run the engine for 10-15 minutes under a substantial load. At the end of this exercise the rings will be re-seated into the cylinders bore. How? The cylinder gets so hot from a lack of lubrication that it becomes sticky. The increased friction of the engine running with gasoline as its lubricant aids in ring wear which helps reseat the rings once you load the engine back up. For a 2-cycle engine, instead of draining the crankcase oil, you simply run a lower oil ratio of modern combustible 2 cycle mix in with regular fuel until the engine gets real hot. Upon shutdown, supply the engine with a good over-saturated mixture of premium gas and Valvoline TCW3 oil, and load it on up. After 15 minutes of use, drain the fuel oil mix and run the proper mixture. I guess you guys think that this is torture for an engine, but in reality it isnt. I have over two dozen extremely rare 2 and 4 cycle engines which I have fixed in this matter. They all run good to this date! Out of the 91 engines I own, 87 of them run, go figure, I have no idea what I am doing.............

Chris
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,898 Posts
Because those are continuous duty ratings!
"The rating that defines the load which can be carried for an indefinite time without exceeding a specified temperature rise." NOT how long you can run it in any position.
You guys sound like the type who only run their two cycle engines with the plug side up in fear of ruining something
I would say operating equipment within safe parameters is not out fear but merely exercising good common sense.
I shut it down, drain its oil and fill the crankcase with gasoline. I run the engine for about 5-7 minutes or until the engine starts to hint that it wants to seize up. The cylinder gets so hot from a lack of lubrication that it becomes sticky
A simple mistake in timing would result in catastrophic failure and the destruction of an engine that should have been properly rebuilt. Lets not forget about the damage inflicted upon the bearings such as galling and scoring.
I guess you guys think that this is torture for an engine, but in reality it isn't.
An opinion not shared by the majority of the maintenance world.
I have no idea what I am doing.............
Lets make it clear that there are others here on the forum that have many years of practical hands on experience from small engine repair to the aviation industry that may not concur with "Old school" short cuts.

As administrator of the forum, I feel that there is nothing more to gain from this post/discussion and will be closed.
Furthermore the afore mentioned practices and/or techniques previously discussed are not recommended by this forum. If you still feel they are beneficial, do so at your own risk and expense!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top