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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Honda HR215 was my first real lawnmower. I got it new back in 2000-2001 and has been a fantastic mower that has seen a lot of use since then. Normal maintenance, and nothing that I can remember has ever gone wrong with it. As much as I am a firm believer in taking care of my equipment as well as I can, this one has always been the machine in my small fleet that has seen the least amount of love.

Anyway, now that you have some background on the mower I decided to experiment with the jetting, something that I had actually never thought of before that Bruce (bwdbrn1) suggested I try. Why mess with a good thing you ask? Well, I have always felt this mower has run a bit on the lean side and could benefit with a bit more juice, but since it's a non-adjustable type carburetor I had always figured there was nothing that could be done about it.

A few weeks ago, Bruce who was helping another member happened to post a photo of the specific carburetor that mine has and in the photo was a particular adjustable screw I had always wondered what its function was, but knew it did not have do with the fuel settings. I sent BW a PM and learned that it controls the idle adjustment speed setting, no wonder it never did anything before when I was turning it at full rpm! Anyway, since BW is quite knowledgeable and has a lot of experience with Hondas, I asked him if he knew of any way that this carburetor could be adjusted and it was then he suggested re jetting it. :idea: He provided me with some excellent links of where I could purchase the jets from and diagrams of the carburetor. The plan was to order the next size up main jet and see the results.

The stock jet turned out to be a #55 and the next size up is a 58, listed from Honda. While at a local Honda PE center getting some tune-up parts for the same machine, I asked if they had a #58 MJ in stock showing them the stock 55 I had for reference. I was a little surprised at their response, actually. They told me they have nothing like that in stock, they don't mess around with that type of thing and if they did, would get into trouble with the EPA. Okay then.

After ordering the #58 on Boats.net, it finally this weekend for some experimenting. After I got it installed, it seemed the mower would not start! This wasn't right at all. After about 10 tries, it finally started but it was not happy. It would not run at a very consistent rate at full rpm. It wasn't horrible, but not how it should be. So, it seems like I actually went in the wrong direction, if anything, and it's actually running a bit on the rich side of things. After swapping back in the 55, there was no denying the sound of the stronger engine, and much easier starting. Maybe next year I will try the next size down MJ and see what its results are. I never would have thought that it was actually running slightly rich.

This was also good a great time to get around to some much needed cleaning while I had things a part, its amazing how it can look nice and clean on the outside but right underneath the engine cover is a different story. On a side note, I have BW to thank once again because of my knucklehead observations on something along the way. In the process of removing the carburetor while observing the linkages and taking some photos so that I would know how to connect everything back up again, realized the throttle linkage was not moving with the lever! I started fretting over this wondering what the heck was wrong. I sent a Bruce a PM with a short video illustrating what was going and he suggested that I pushing the bail in because that is what engages it!:bag:

Thanks for reading.
 

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Well, ya' never know until you try. :dunno:

If I remember right, they only list three different size jets, 55 being standard, and the others, 50 and 52, for high altitude settings. Wonder what the 52 would do for you? Does yours have a fixed pilot screw, or one with a limiter cap?

Heeyy, maybe nitros...:idea: You'd need to put duals on it for sure then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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I've got some jets that run in the 80s and 90s range for my kitted PA50. Bet the HR215 wouldn't like them at all either!:bag:

You used to be able to remove the limiter cap on some models by applying heat with a soldering iron. The heat would soften the glue so you could remove the cap, then you could remove the pilot screw completely to clean the pilot jet passages, screw it back in, adjust the carb, and then re-glue the limiter cap.

Others have a sort of wasp shaped shaft to the pilot screw that you literally have to break off in order to remove the pilot screw using something like a rubber hose that would slip over the stub left to twist it out. I was able to use tweezers on one I did like that, and one I just did required a reverse drill to get the old pilot screw out to clean the pilot jet passages. Then you have to get an entirely new pilot screw that comes with it's own limiter to apply once it's adjusted properly.

Mind you, working too much on these things is, as the dealer pointed out, frowned upon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Experiments are just that-experiments. It's all a big adventure! At least you know what didn't work!:2th:
That's definitely right! :cool: You never know until you try.

I've got some jets that run in the 80s and 90s range for my kitted PA50. Bet the HR215 wouldn't like them at all either!:bag:
Probably not. :dunno:

You used to be able to remove the limiter cap on some models by applying heat with a soldering iron. The heat would soften the glue so you could remove the cap, then you could remove the pilot screw completely to clean the pilot jet passages, screw it back in, adjust the carb, and then re-glue the limiter cap.

Others have a sort of wasp shaped shaft to the pilot screw that you literally have to break off in order to remove the pilot screw using something like a rubber hose that would slip over the stub left to twist it out. I was able to use tweezers on one I did like that, and one I just did required a reverse drill to get the old pilot screw out to clean the pilot jet passages. Then you have to get an entirely new pilot screw that comes with it's own limiter to apply once it's adjusted properly.
Interesting, thanks for the info. It sounds like quite a bit of work!
If only, if only, they would still produce adjustable carbs so that you could dial them in perfectly. I think in this case, that's all that would be needed.

Yeah, the good ol' EPA is here to tell you what to do.:help::ROFL
:mad:
 
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