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Farmers put water in the tires of their tractors, then add air to finish them off. The water adds weight and traction. They also add wheel weights.

Anybody ever done either on a lawnmower?

Here is my YTH21K46, just after using it the first time today. I'm impressed so far, but I do have some ditch banks that I was just brainstorming some way to get a little better traction and grip on.
 

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Farmers generally add a calcium water mix to their tires for increased weight. The major difference between a farm tractor and your riding lawnmower is size, and of course the necessity of a tube type tire/rim. I have seen the detriment of using calcium and or water as ballast in tubeless tires/rims, and would not advise doing so, unless your rims are powdercoated. Otherwise, they will rust out in short order! The big question in my book is why? What can you possibly gain by adding water to your tractor, 20 lbs at best, that is not going to be any appreciable gain. You are better off adding wheel weights, or hanging suitcase weights off of the rear of the tractor if you are loosing traction. If you are trying to tow something large offroad, or mow in swampy areas, you may want to consider agricultural tires, or a larger heavier tractor!

Here is a good chart to look at,
http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/resmgmt/publist/200Series/210104-1.pdf

Chris
 

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I've had a JD GT242 garden tractor for about 20 years and when I bought it new they loaded the turf tires with water and antifreeze - not salt. I also run wheel weights. The rims are still fine. As long as you avoid salt, you should be OK.

I keep the tires marginally pressurized with air, but have never had a problem. The larger the tires, the greater the traction advantage. I live in mountainous terrain, so in addition to the added weight I installed chains on the rear tires - and they have never been off the tractor. I use them summer and winter, to mow, blow snow, haul stuff - 100 % of the time. The tractor manual warns "never" to use chains while mowing, as a poorly installed set of chains can come off and present a hazard. But around here, I'd never mow without the chains. Ain't suburbia here - this is in the Vermont hills.
 

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I put calcium in the rear tires of a Murray in 1988. Wheel weights, chains, and about 80 pounds of slab steel hanging off the rear fenders. I had a 36" plow. It has an 11hp motor. When I plowed with it, I could stack snow 4 to 5 feet high. Never got stuck. The calcium is still in the tires. I eventually wore out the plow and went to a blower.
 

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Im thinking of adding washer fluid to my friends Isiki I use all the time.

May add some to all my fleet too
 
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