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I have a 1962 4 door Impala I want to do a frame-off resto on. (It was Grandma's car, custom ordered with a 'Vette 327, cast iron Powerglide and a Posi rear) Having seen what the Pro rigs go for, I like the looks of this build. And I just thought about an alternative: Modify an engine stand. Same principle and can usually be found on CL pretty cheap. Of course you don't get the satisfaction of building it from scratch yourself.
 

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I have a 1962 4 door Impala I want to do a frame-off resto on. (It was Grandma's car, custom ordered with a 'Vette 327, cast iron Powerglide and a Posi rear) Having seen what the Pro rigs go for, I like the looks of this build. And I just thought about an alternative: Modify an engine stand. Same principle and can usually be found on CL pretty cheap. Of course you don't get the satisfaction of building it from scratch yourself.
Sorry, TMR

Was away and didn't see your post.

YES! There are quite a few who use the light weight engine stands and covert them to a Rotesserie. They do well with light unibody and small framed sports cars. They are a bit flimsy with the mid size domestic models...and very shaky with full sized cars and trucks. I'm speaking of frames or bodies.

I have seen a few folks who cut and weld in gussets to strengthen the vertical supports. And seen them carry on with more gussets to the lateral support as well. The base stock (thickness) is too thin to be completely trustworthy IMO. But not a problem for light weight duty.
 

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Thanks for the input on using engine stands. guess I'll nix that idea. Would hate to drop the body on the floor!! Now you got me thinking about solid shafts and pillow block bearings to make turning smoother.....
 
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