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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to this forum but not to snow blower forum. I liked that forum and wanted the equivalent friendly and helpful lawnmower forum to support my 1996 Woods Mow'n machine that I am trying to keep operational to avoid spending another $7500 for a similar but new mower.

My Woods mower has both a DT 61 61" mower deck and the snowblower attachment. I also had a cab enclosure but it self destructed due to metal fatique. Steel cabs work harden if left installed year round. Simply put, they get beat to death. No amount of re-welding worked to save the enclosure. This 1996 Woods only has 760 hours of run time but I have repaired and replaced quite a bit

Motor is a 20 HP Kawasaki FD620D-BS03 two cylinder water cooled motor that is like what was used in the John Deere 425 and 445. These have a beyond warranty period know failure of the composite cam gear that fails between 700 hours to 1000 hours. My concern was whether or not my Woods (made by Grasshopper for Woods) mower had the same problem with a composite. Long story short. After calling Woods, Kawasaki, Grasshopper to ask the question regarding the camshaft specified in the Woods version of the Kawasaki FD620D I found that none of these organizations had a clue. So, after posting a question to the Gator Guy he suggested simply pulling the muffler cover, muffler, and water pump to check the gear. I did and found it has a composite cam gear. Repair kits are not available from Kawasaki, but there are three sources for kits that include the camshaft, tappets (valves), springs, governor, gaskets, etc. for about $300. A replacement water pump is another $60. I suppose when done with the hoses replaced the total part costs are about $400 plus my labor. Below is a picture of the cam gear which is composite. It feels like plastic and no magnet sticks to it.


Below is the latest problem with installing new wheels and tires on the DT61 mower deck. It shows how the tires rub the deck. It appears as the though design didn't allow for normal wear and there is too much caster built into the wheel lift assembly which premits tire rub. See the picture below:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to MLF Pro100. Glad to have you come on over and join us here.
Welcome Prof!

Looks like you have your work cut out for ya on that one!
Welcome to the site! I hope we can help you with any problems on your projects! :2th:
Thanks guys. I think I figured out how to correct the tire rub program. I took the worse side (left side) apart and studied all the holes and bolts. Conclusion is simple. The are multiple bolt holes that have worn over the last twenty years. The wheel and tire needs to move forward and there are no replacement parts to fix it so I think the easiest way is modify the deck fork by cutting a wedge on each side from front to back and then closing it up with some well applied whacks with a dead blow hammer then TIG welding. It should increase the clearance so the tires do NOT rub the mower deck.
 

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Welcome! Your machine is one we never got into yet. Nice easy fix you came up with!
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Welcome! Your machine is one we never got into yet. Nice easy fix you came up with!
Having to cut a wedge and re-weld is simple enough but if the engineers had thought it through they could have simply designed in more clearance to start with provided they understood how the mower deck and wheel lift assembly would wear with use. This version of a WOODS ZTR was made by Grasshopper for Woods. Based on my experience with this WOODS mower which has only 760 hours of run time I am not a fan of these designs. I have had a range of electrical problems that would shut down the mower. That one cost me a few hundred dollars to have my local repair shop get going again. I am sure the time they spent diagnosing far exceeded the invoice I paid.

The Kawasaki FD620D is blessed with the plastic cam gear due to John Deere wanting a quieter motor. Of course, warranties are well expired by the time they fail, but the clowns at Kawasaki merely say they "build to John Deere specs" and John Deere hasn't been writing any checks to reimburse owners either. The shame is since my WOODS was built during the same era I got same bad design decision I can wait to see it fail or replace it before it does.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Kawasaki doesn't sell rebuild kits. Short blocks are scarce. New motors are nearly $3000. I think they dumped their inventory about 5 or 6 years ago and a new crate motor could be picked up for $800. Today a new radiator has a MSRP of about $500.

So when my motor starting running hot on hot summer days I decided to change the thermostat which requires pulling the radiator. When I pulled the radiator I found an exuberant cleaning of the radiator fins with a power washer bent over some fins. I checked out the passages in the radiator and held it up to a bright light. I would estimate nearly half of the radiator was blocked with cottonwoods. Which literally looked like tuffs of cotton stuffed into the radiator core. With no radiators available at reasonable price my wife suggested washing it in the dishwasher. Two long cycles in the dishwasher, a pair of tweezers and I was able to straighten out the fins and open up the radiator by picking out the cottonwoods. Do you know how many passages there are in a radiator core? More than you can imagine. I can now see light passing through 90% of the radiator. What a royal PITA.
:sidelaugh
 

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Yeesh, that would be a pain! Is there anyway to make a small frame to hold something like window screen mesh in front of the radiator to catch the fluff before it wedged in there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeesh, that would be a pain! Is there anyway to make a small frame to hold something like window screen mesh in front of the radiator to catch the fluff before it wedged in there?
There is a protective (expanded metal) screen that slides on but the cotton woods are fluffy and find there way through the screen too. It just built up over twenty years. It is kind of like death by a thousand paper cuts. The back part of my property is lined with cotton wood trees. I used to have a swimming pool that would be covered with the cottonwood seeds and jam up the filter and drive me nuts. After my daughter went to college I tore out the pool for many reasons and keeping the pool clean and filter clean is only one of them.

Cottonwoods are a nuisance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Parts required to replace camshaft and water pump

The parts required to replace the camshaft tend to be a guarded list to prevent others from competing to putting together kits and reselling at a local dealer or on ebay. Kawasaki doesn't sell any part kits like other companies. You have to look up every part. While frustrated with put together kit seller saying no to requests for item-by-item BOM for the camshaft replacement kit I took the plunge and bought a camshaft replacement kit. I paid $379 for a kit ($289 for the standard kit plus $57 for the water pump plus shipping).

I wanted a reference for myself of the parts I bought so I created the list of parts by going through each part bag, writing down the description, part number and taking a picture. Below is the list with the pictures. Note: water pump is NOT mandatory but these engines have water pump failures. I figured I would replace the pump when the engine is apart. If you have a FDS620D with plastic camshaft AS03 and BS03 1997 and earlier you should be wary of the fact that these early models are blessed with the quieter but short lifespan plastic cam gear. All of the early models come with the plastic cam gear. I have talked with 3 or 4 Kawasaki tech support people and they still believe the plastic cam gears were only made for John Deere. I can attest they are dead wrong. My Kawasaki powered Woods motor (circa 1996) came with a plastic cam gear. You can copy the list for future reference if you have a FD620D motor with a plastic cam gear. Also, the ebay FD620D cam kit market will eventually shrink to nothing as more of these early plastic cam equipped engines either die or have the cam replaced with a proper metal gear camshaft
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PARTS FOUND IN THE KIT AS RECEIVED from ebay seller partsforyourmachine seller.
1. Crank Oil Seal 92049-2112 (also in the bag was an oval o-ring and a nylon T)
2. Intake gasket 11060-2088 - qty 1
3. Intake gasket 11060-2087 - qty 1
4. Carb gasket 11061- 2106 - qty 1
5. Exhaust gasket 11060-2079 - qty 2
6. Rocker cover gasket for black composite covers 11061-2182 - qty 2
7. Head gasket 11004-2107 - qty 2
8. Water pump gasket 11060-2450 - qty 1
9. Water pump COVER gasket 11060-2451 - qty 1
10. Governor Gear assembly 49110-2073 - qty 1
11. Push rods 13116-2057 - qty 4
12. Crankcase gasket 11060-2449 - qty 1
13. Pivot arm 39003-2064 - qty 1
14. Valve springs 47078-2082 - qty 4
15. Tappets 12032-2064 - qty 4
16. Oil filter 49065-7010 - qty 1
17. Water pump 49044-2066 - qty 1
 

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Thanks for posting your findings!
 

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Thanks for taking the time to separate and list all of the parts for future reference. You may have just saved yourself and someone else a lot of frustration in finding those later on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Kawasaki FD620D S03 partial rebuild for WOODS 6210

Below is a bigger list of all the parts (including what was posted earlier) I have bought so far to maintain my 1996 Woods 6210 Mow'N Machine. It is nearly a $1,000 but is cheaper than buying a new or even used commercial grade mower.

PARTS FOUND IN THE KIT AS RECEIVED from ebay seller partsforyourmachine seller ($380).
1. Crank Oil Seal 92049-2112 (also in the bag was an oval o-ring and a nylon T)
2. Intake gasket 11060-2088 - qty 1
3. Intake gasket 11060-2087 - qty 1
4. Carb gasket 11061- 2106 - qty 1
5. Exhaust gasket 11060-2079 - qty 2
6. Rocker cover gasket for black composite covers 11061-2182 - qty 2
7. Head gasket 11004-2107 - qty 2
8. Water pump gasket 11060-2450 - qty 1
9. Water pump COVER gasket 11060-2451 - qty 1
10. Governor Gear assembly 49110-2073 - qty 1
11. Push rods 13116-2057 - qty 4
12. Crankcase gasket 11060-2449 - qty 1
13. Pivot arm 39003-2064 - qty 1
14. Valve springs 47078-2082 - qty 4
15. Tappets 12032-2064 - qty 4
16. Oil filter 49065-7010 - qty 1
17. Water pump 49044-2066 - qty 1
Additional parts purchased to finish the engine rebuild:
1. Valve keepers (Repair clinic ) at $.70 each Qty 7 -- $4.90. I lost one so I bought some spares.
2. Exhaust manifold studs (Repair clinic) at $.70 each - qty 4 -- $2.80. The threaded studs came out of the cylinder head on 3 of the 4 studs. New ones were in order.
3. Exhaust manifold nuts (Repair Clinic) at $1.20 each - qty 4 -- $4.80
4. Thermo Switch (Repair clinic) at $24.50 qty 1. The thermo switch reads engine temp and sends a signal to the red light on the dash warning you of an over temp.
5. Coolant Reservoir Tank (Repair clinic) at $14.50 qty 1. The original somehow ended up with a small hole in the side near the top. Silicone RTV plugged the hole for the last 2 years. Time for new one.
6. Kawasaki spark plugs (Repair Clinic) at $2.70 ea. Qty 2 -- $5.40
7. Thermostat Manufacturer #49054-2056 (Repair Clinic) Qty 1 -- $20.80. I wanted everything new in the cooling system.
8. T-Stat gasket (Repair Clinic) qty 1 $1.70

Other parts
1. Dual tail wheel for my 6210 Woods (Messicks) $215 including $20 for shipping -- This dual tail wheel setup takes the load of the rear single tail wheel. A single tail wheel Woods does not make these any more. Messicks had one last new old stock sitting on its shelves.
2. PTO Belts (matched pair) PN 70341 -- $42.51 plus shipping. This was the proverbial no brainer. I had to remove the rear PTO to access the back of the motor so the $43 for a pair of new belts at this time should last another 1000 hours.
3. New front tires for the mower deck (foam filled). The originals were foam filled but the foam broke down after 20 years and the two mower deck caster wheels were pretty much dragging their way around. These new tires and wheels cost $115 for the pair. The new wheels and tires are sized to specification but close initial tolerance and 20 years of wear resulted in the new tires rubbing the mower deck. I am fabricating a modification of the forks so they have enough clearance. These are caster style wheels on the front of the mower deck. Picture too much caster angle do to all the wear and tear on the assembly.
4. New radiator from Craigslist $175 including upper and lower hoses. (List is over $500). The original was nearly 50% plugged with cottonwoods and many fins were folded over. Yes, I cleaned and straighten the radiator one fin at a time, but a new radiator will only make the motor run better come the hot days of summer.
5. Replacement muffler I bought on ebay a couple of years ago for $50. Like most Kawasaki parts the MSRP is just ridiculous. Since had to remove the heat shield and muffler to replace the camshaft this is the perfect time to install the new muffler. The muffler bolts to heads using studs which the nuts rusted in place and 3 of the 4 studs simply turned into bolts and came right out of the head castings. They are threaded so new studs are going back into engine during final assembly. RepairClinic.com is located about 5 miles from my house and they are open 7 days a week. Pricey at times, but they have a vast array of parts for many appliances and small engine parts.

Grand Total above $881.91

You might wonder why am putting in this kind of money and effort into a 20 year old mower. The answer is simple -- I don't want to spend $10K on a new one. Maybe in 5 years I might just say the heck with it and drop $30K on a new machine like my next door neighbor did. He bought a Polaris XD diesel with cab, AC, heat, AM/FM radio, mower, snow blower, blade and front loader.

This Woods mower also has a snow blower attachment and a steel enclosure cab. The cab died a slow death 2 years ago from metal fatique and the metal fractured. I have a Mig and Tig welder but each repair was more and more welds on fatiqued metal just wouldn't work. Weld up one area and then the area next to it would fractures. It was like wack a mole. In 1996 this Woods 6210 ZTR with mower deck and snow blower cost me $10K. A new one would be nice and they have gotten better but it would set me back another $12K for new or $7500 for a decent used one. I hope my repairs, maintenance and upgrades let me use this for another 20 years. In the past month I have learned more than I ever wanted to know about this mower, its engine, and components.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Update on the parts list. I added rings and valve stem seals. I also received the belts for the PTO (not shown) and the new old stock dual tail wheel assembly for the Woods 6210 mower deck. Installing the assembly was easy.

  • Air tires to 35 psi on new dual tail wheel.
  • Jack up tail of Woods mower and use an impact to remove 4 bolts to takeoff the single tail wheel.
  • Install dual tail wheel.

Picture below.

 

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You don't play around when it comes to replacement parts better than the original!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
This baby will be better than brand new when you get done!
Maybe as good as new. From front to rear:

  • New front mower deck wheels & foam filled tires with custom/modified forks to correct for wear.
  • New radiator
  • New Thermostat
  • New coolant bypass hose
  • New fuel line
  • New Thermo Switch
  • New valve springs, keepers and stem seals
  • Valves lapped
  • New spark plugs
  • New rings
  • New camshaft (original reason for teardown)
  • New tappets
  • New pushrods
  • Oil filter screen cleaned & oil pump inspected
  • New governor flyweight gear
  • New water pump
  • New muffler
  • New PTO belts
  • New dual tail wheel assembly

It could use a new seat but the seat is a real dumb design with all the elements sold individually or the complete seat for nearly $415. I tried to adapt a very nice after market seat but the Woods seat design makes mounting it virtually impossible.

Funny, it is going to be almost new. The paint needs some work. I do have some of the older but still usable paint. It is when Tractor Supply sold high quality paints. I used this paint in the past to paint the fenders which were stuck to the main section with two sided tape. I had to Mig weld some brackets to hold the fenders on. This paint is the good tractor paint you used to be able to buy from Tractor Supply. The paint they sell now is worthless. It makes Rustoleum look good.

Below is the infamous plastic cam gear that started it all:



Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Some pictures as well.

Rebuilt heads and my handy dandy home made valve spring compressor.





Replacing valve stem seals with a little help from 3 in 1 oil.




Removed pistons not yet cleaned








Inside of crankcase cover -- yellowed geared is a governor gear that's easy to replace. The plate with two screws and a tube covers the oil screen that picks up the big chunks. Mine was very clean. The bigger metal gear drives the oil pump. It was fine when opened and inspected.
 

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I like the duals! I'll bet they offer a smooth ride with the increased flotation.
 
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