Snow thrower won't start - Lawn Mower Forums : Lawnmower Reviews, Repair, Pricing and Discussion Forum
Small Engine Repair Discussion Talk about issues or tips you may have for others regarding small engine repairs.

 1Likes
  • 1 Post By e.fisher26
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 1 (permalink) Old 01-20-2020, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Snow thrower won't start

Hey guys;
My brother has an Airens model 921030 2-stage snow thrower. It's about 5 years old. This machine has had issues with starting in the past, and a couple days ago when we had a light snowfall, he was unable to start it. I checked it out, but could not get it running. Here is what I know:


The spark plug was wet - so I am assuming the engine was flooded from the multiple starting attempts
There is a spark. I pulled the plug out, and was able to observe a spark when the engine was cranked using the electric starter
The spark plug looks OK. There doesn't appear to be any carbon buildup, and I didn't see any cracks. The plug was replaced 1 or 2 years ago.


The gas in the tank is very old. Probably 4-1/2 years old. I had added Stabil to the gas, and applied a tag to the can. That tag reads 7/15, indicating I added the Stabil in July 2015.


I am fairly certain that the machine started and ran OK in early November. Could already stale gas go completely bad in only 2-1/2 months?


I left the spark plug out in hopes the engine would dry out in a week or so, then plan to return and replace the gas with a fresh tank.


One thing I am unsure about is whether I will be able to get my siphon into the tank, as it has a plastic guard which will prevent my hose from being dropped into the tank. The siphon is the one that has the metal valve at the end:


How difficult is it to remove the plastic guard?


I appreciate any suggestions.
Thanks
FW
Ultrarunner2020 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 1 (permalink) Old 01-20-2020, 08:42 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 55
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
The gas is too old, won’t fire. Drain all of it, clean the carb and new spark plug


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
youngmech likes this.
e.fisher26 is online now  
post #3 of 1 (permalink) Old 01-20-2020, 09:26 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the advice. Not sure I can clean the carb myself. Not too good with that sort of thing, and being winter, it would be difficult to work outdoors. No place inside to work on carb.
Of course, if there is some sort of 'miracle' carb cleaner I can add to the NEW gas...


Edit: I probably should add that at the end of each season, I have closed the gas valve and allowed the machine to run until it starts to sputter. So there shouldn't be any (or much) gas left in the carb to gunk it up.

Last edited by Ultrarunner2020; 01-20-2020 at 10:31 PM.
Ultrarunner2020 is online now  
post #4 of 1 (permalink) Old 01-21-2020, 01:56 AM
Administrator
 
Mark / Ohio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Central Ohio USA
Posts: 5,905
Thanks: 358
Thanked 704 Times in 614 Posts
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner2020 View Post
...Edit: I probably should add that at the end of each season, I have closed the gas valve and allowed the machine to run until it starts to sputter. So there shouldn't be any (or much) gas left in the carb to gunk it up.

That's good in that the small amount of gas in the carb will collect moisture faster I think and cause corrosion faster then the larger amount of fuel in the tank. Flip side though is once the gas in the tank is bad then you open the valve then goo and particles get sucked into the carb. The end result is the same. Since the plug is wet that might actually be a good sign that once you drain out all the old gas and put fresh in that it might start up and run. The key will be how well it runs if it does start. Lot of carbs now you can get a replacement at a pretty decent price to the point it is not worth trying to clean up the old one.


My suggestion would be to get a can of carb cleaner spray, (my personal standby is Gumout), disconnect the fuel line from the carb and drain out the old fuel from the tank and slosh some fresh in there and let it run out the fuel line. While the fuel line is disconnected from the carb spray some Gumout in the fuel inlet and then connect everything back up and add some gas. Then spray some more Gumout in the air intake side of the carb and see if it will fire with the fresh gas and the new spark plug.


If your plug and ignition is working okay, the engine will fire a few times just by spraying Gumout in the air intake. Gumout works well as a starting fluid the same as squirting some gas in the air intake of the carb.

Mark - 2002 John Deere LT150H

Mark / Ohio is offline  
post #5 of 1 (permalink) Old 01-21-2020, 07:47 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 55
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Should let the motor shut itself off completely with the gas off, but still any gas more then a year old may not fire anyway. Dropping the bowl on the bottom of the carb just to clean that MAY work


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
e.fisher26 is online now  
post #6 of 1 (permalink) Old 01-21-2020, 10:22 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks guys;
Sounds like I could get lucky, or have a real problem. My brother told me that he did let the engine run until stopping after shutting off the fuel valve at the end of last season. I wasn't sure whether that is a good practice or not; I read that if you let the engine run until it begins surging, it could cause damage. On the generator, I would let it run until it started to surge, then choke it, to stop the surging, and it would die very quickly after that. Never had any trouble with the genny.


Quote:
That's good in that the small amount of gas in the carb will collect moisture faster I think and cause corrosion faster then the larger amount of fuel in the tank. Flip side though is once the gas in the tank is bad then you open the valve then goo and particles get sucked into the carb. The end result is the same.

Interesting. That's exactly what a friend told me when I told him that I let the engine die after closing the fuel valve. It does make sense to me, but I had always been told to let the gas drain from the system before storage.


I'm not sure whether I will be able to do any work on the carb myself. I should be able to do the spray into the carb, but removing it and attempting to clean, probably not. I don't have a suitable place to work. Garage is detached, thus unheated, and cannot bring into the house. Even if I could I have no place to do such work.
My brother will probably end up taking the machine to a repair shop.
Ultrarunner2020 is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Lawn Mower Forums : Lawnmower Reviews, Repair, Pricing and Discussion Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome