John Deere JX75 makes horrid sounds unless blade is engaged. - Page 2 - Lawn Mower Forums : Lawnmower Reviews, Repair, Pricing and Discussion Forum
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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 07:00 AM
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Your mower should have the Warner 2-piece style of clutch (section 50-05-11 of the Technical Manual). That said, the manual only deals with clutch removal and doesn’t go into bearing replacement (Deere makes most of their income from parts sales). Looking at the broken clutch I have in my spare parts I see the issues with top bearing removal. You can remove the snap ring, but no easy way to punch out the old bearing. Your removal of the bearing by careful cutting is worth a shot. Once the old one is out pressing in a new bearing shouldn't be too tough.I had always read that if the top bearing was bad (like mine was) you were buying a new clutch. The bearing removal issue may be why that was recommended.

The clutch friction pad I was asking about is the round disk on the lower part of the clutch that is made of brake lining type material. As long as it has decent thickness you should be fine. If it gets too thin or shatters into pieces, then it’s time for a new lower half of the clutch.
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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 03:38 PM Thread Starter
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Epic Fail.

I got the old bearing out of the upper clutch.

Haven't got the new bearing all the way on yet, but it's close. Problem is: the bearing is not longer spinning (not entirely locked up, but close to that). Twas a tight fit -- too tight, I suppose.

I could remove the bearing, destroying it, order a new bearing, and try again. Bearing was a 6006-(something) -- I think 6006-2RS. That bearing is 2 for $11 on Amazon. Perhaps let a machine shop install the new bearing this time.

Gonna have to think on this.
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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Dan Kilhoffer View Post
Epic Fail.

I got the old bearing out of the upper clutch.

Haven't got the new bearing all the way on yet, but it's close. Problem is: the bearing is not longer spinning (not entirely locked up, but close to that). Twas a tight fit -- too tight, I suppose.

I could remove the bearing, destroying it, order a new bearing, and try again. Bearing was a 6006-(something) -- I think 6006-2RS. That bearing is 2 for $11 on Amazon. Perhaps let a machine shop install the new bearing this time.

Gonna have to think on this.
Sorry to hear that. Removing it and seeing if you can have a shop press in a new bearing may be your best hope. Otherwise you are stuck ordering a new blade brake clutch to the tune of $175. Don't give up, though. Although these BBC's are a pain the rear when they aren't working, you will have any awesome mower once you get it going again. Well worth a little trouble and pain now for the end result.
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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Dan Kilhoffer View Post
Epic Fail.

I got the old bearing out of the upper clutch.

Haven't got the new bearing all the way on yet, but it's close. Problem is: the bearing is not longer spinning (not entirely locked up, but close to that). Twas a tight fit -- too tight, I suppose.

I could remove the bearing, destroying it, order a new bearing, and try again. Bearing was a 6006-(something) -- I think 6006-2RS. That bearing is 2 for $11 on Amazon. Perhaps let a machine shop install the new bearing this time.

Gonna have to think on this.
By the way, what did you use to seat the new bearing? The recommendation would be to use a socket that is nearly just slighty smaller than the outside of the bearing and grease the outside of the bearing. Then you can put the socket on top of it and use a hammer to gently tap on the socket and seat the bearing. Of course if you have access to a press, then that negates the socket and hammer method of seating. And if that doesn't work, then have a shop press in the new bearing may be the only option short of complete clutch replacement.
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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 04:47 PM Thread Starter
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i began to think maybe what I thought was the bearing no longer working was actually something else binding. Took another look. In hammering on the bearing, I had messed up the plate. It had pulled away, exposing metal connections which had been hidden under epoxy (or something like it).

Since I had nothing to lose, I 3 pound hammered it back in place. Son of a gun, the bearing works now. And, surprisingly, the place for the bearing retainer clip appeared, and there is no need for more hammering.

The metal plate had pulled away from it's original place where it had been held there by what looked like welding. The pounding broke all the welding (epoxy?) away. I'm thinking I can put JB-Weld in there to make it like it was.

Other than that, I declaring victory. Apparently, it is indeed possible to cut out the old bearing, and insert a new one.
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post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 05:10 PM Thread Starter
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To seat the bearing, I used a 3 pound hammer, a flat metal piece (initially, when that would work), then a 30mm socket, moving it around so it caught a different outside spot on the bearing each time (it always covered some of the inside of the bearing at the same time). It was a tight fit, so I hit the bearing really hard. Otherwise, it wouldn't move. And if it didn't move, my only other option was to cut it out. Hitting it really hard won out over cutting another bearing out.

I found myself, many times, contemplating taking the clutch to a machine shop. Always found there was something I could try, before giving up. In my case, time isn't money.

Last edited by Dan Kilhoffer; 05-15-2019 at 07:07 PM. Reason: minor wrong word
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post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-16-2019, 10:39 PM Thread Starter
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Installing the inner clutch half, I discovered all my heavy handed hammering had some down sides. The arm off the clutch that cable connects to the self propel activation on the handlebar needed bending to fit in it's area. It's a soft metal, and easily reshaped, but twas confusing when it initially was jammed and couldn't be moved.

The part of the upper clutch that slides onto the shaft needed some Dremel time to restore the end of it where the hammer hit and mashed it around a bit.

I suspect, had I been experienced with these mower parts, I wouldn't have needed to hammer anything all that hard.
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post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-27-2019, 03:14 PM
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There is a video on youtube showing how to repair the friction lining on the BBC by gluing an abrasive disc from an angle grinder to the clutch's metal surface. But if you scroll down the comments there are a few remarks about substituting the abrasive disc (which has to be butchered to fit) for a part that is readily available at agricultural stores. Agrisupply item # 40219 This seems to be a standard clutch repair disc for agricultural purposes.

The youtube video is entitled "John Deere JX75 Blade Clutch, Repair/MOD DIY"
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post #19 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-27-2019, 03:17 PM
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Check youtube for a video entitled: John Deere JX75 Blade Clutch, Repair/MOD DIY

Scroll down the comments and you will find a part that can be bought from agricultural stores that can be used to replace the broken friction lining on your clutch. The part is: Agrisupply item # 40219
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